16 December 2011

Who is UNICEF? Join us a make a difference (public version)

A 3-minute video in Thai with English subtitle about UNICEF and its works in Thailand, which protrays several challenges facing children today.

15 December 2011

Who is UNICEF? Join us to make a difference



A 5-min video in Thai with English subtitle about UNICEF and its works in Thailand. The video protrays several challenges facing children today. The video is also aimed at promoting partnership between UNICEF and corporate sector in Thailand

16 November 2011

Breastfeeding best to protect babies from illnesses during floods

© UNICEF Thailand/2011/Piyanun Kiatnaruyuth

Story by Nattha Keenapan

(The story was published in the Bangkok Post on November 15, 2011)

AYUTTHAYA, Thailand, – Sujira Imsamran gave birth just two days after being evacuated from her house in Ayutthaya Province, one of the areas hardest-hit by flooding.  Despite the stress of being displaced and worrying about her baby’s well-being, Sujira is trying her best to keep breastfeeding in order to keep him healthy throughout this difficult time.

15 November 2011

UNICEF provides mosquito nets to protect evacuees from dengue fever

Children inside a UNICEF-supplied mosquito net during a demonstration by public health workers. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Piyanun Kiatnaruyuth

By Andy Brown

BANGKOK – After losing their homes and in some cases loved ones to the Thai floods, families staying at the evacuation centre set up in Bang Krai Nok Temple in northern Bangkok now have something else to worry about – dengue fever.

10 November 2011

Children find shelter from the Thai floods at a Bangkok temple


Twelve-year-old Tang with his sister Ice at Laksi Temple evacuation centre. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Athit Perawongmetha
By Andy Brown

BANGKOK – Forced to flee his home due to rising floodwaters and now living in a Buddhist temple serving as makeshift evacuation centre, 12-year-old Tang can somehow still find a reason to smile.

03 November 2011

University assists flood-affected families in Bangkok


A doctor checks Peem’s stomach at a health clinic at Phranakhon Rajabhat University. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Athit Perawongmetha

By Andy Brown

BANGKOK, 3 November 2011 – One of the thousands of people made homeless by Thailand’s devasating floods, a tired Gaew waits with with her chubby five-month-old baby, Peem, outside a makeshift health clinic at Bangkok’s Phranakhon Rajabhat University.

“Peem has a stomach ache so we’re waiting to see the doctor,” Gaew says anxiously, holding the boy on her lap. “We’ve been here three days. We left our house in Pathum Thani when the water got waist high.”

31 October 2011

Child-friendly spaces: comfort zones for children affected by floods

A girl hangs her drawing at the child-friendly space in Ayutthaya City Hall. Child-friendly spaces are designed to serve as safe and protective places for children in times of emergency. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Piyanunt

By Nattha Keenapan

AYUTTHAYA, Thailand – Kanitha Kaicharit, 10, spends more than an hour each day travelling to Ayutthaya City Hall with her grandmother in order to get the free food and water being distributed to flood-affected families. After arriving, her grandmother rushes to the crowded food distribution tent, but Kanitha’s destination is a livelier area filled with laughing and playing children, all of whom are  affected by the floods.

24 October 2011

Just the right amount: a new process of iodising salt in Thailand


Sho Maw, a 33-year-old worker at the Petchsakorn Salt Factory in Samut Sakorn Province, spends hours each day spraying and hand-mixing potassium iodate into some 500 kilograms of salt. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Athit Perawongmetha
Story by Nattha Keenapan

(The story was published in the Bangkok Post newspaper on 24 October 2011)

BANGKOK – Despite spending hours spraying and hand-mixing potassium iodate into some 500 kilograms of salt each day, Sho Maw, a 33-year-old worker at the Petchsakorn Salt Factory in Samut Sakorn Province, has never been certain that each pack of iodized salt she has sold over the past few years contained the proper amount of iodine.

15 October 2011

Exile on main street

Four-year-old Tong makes a tie-dye t-shirt for sale in a gift shop.© UNICEF Thailand/2011/Andy Brown
Story Andy Brown

UNICEF i takes popular Thai bloggers to see a drop-in centre for street children in Chiang Mai

CHIANG MAI, Thailand - Last week, we took a group of popular Thai bloggers to see projects for marginalised children in Thailand’s Chiang Mai district. After two days visiting orchard schools in Fang (see part two of this blog), we returned to Chiang Mai itself to visit a drop-in centre for street children.

11 October 2011

Fruits of labour

A boy holds up an orange during a maths class at the orchard day school. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Andy Brown

By Andy Brown

Day two of UNICEF Thailand’s bloggers trip to orchard schools for migrant children

CHAING MAI, Thailand - I was in Chiang Mai district last week, introducing a group of Thai bloggers to UNICEF-supported projects for marginalised children. After our visit to the orchard night school (see part one of this story), we went to see a day school in the same area.
We got up early and set off in our vans for an orange orchard outside Fang town.

10 October 2011

UNICEF takes popular bloggers to see an orchard night school for migrant children

Children at the orchard day school in Fang, Chiang Mai. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Andy Brown


By Andy Brown

CHAING MAI, Thailand - Thailand is rightly famous for the quality of its fruit. The sois (small streets) where I live in Bangkok’s Aree neighbourhood are lined with stalls selling oranges, dragon fruit, mangos and whatever else is in season. The brightly coloured fruit is piled up on mobile trailers: fresh, plentiful and cheap. But this abundance comes at a price. As we discovered during a trip to Chiang Mai province in the north of the country, many of Thailand’s fruit orchards are staffed by low-paid migrant workers, whose children rarely get to go to school.

13 August 2011

Making Breastfeeding Possible for Working Moms

Chanthira Kankaew, a worker at Marigot jewellery factory, presents breastmilk which she expresses during the day. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Athit Perawongmetha

Story by Heamakarn Sricharatchanya

SAMUT PRAKAN, Thailand - Every morning, Natnaree Kaewprakob breastfeeds her 14-month-old baby, Natthida, before going to work at a factory in Bangpu Industrial Estate in Samut Prakan province. During the day, she expresses her breast milk a few times and stores it to make sure that Natthida has enough to feed on the next day. And when she returns from work at night, she breastfeeds her little one again.

29 June 2011

Education for ethnic hill tribe children in remote area of Mae Hong Son .



MAE HONG SON, Thailand - A mother in Pang Mapa district talks about the UNICEF-supported school in her community, which is located in remote, mountainous area in the northern province of Mae Hong Son, Thailand.

25 May 2011

The Road Home: A Burmese boy trafficked into Thailand



By Heamakarn Sricharatchanya/Video by Nattha Keenapan

(The story was published in the Bangkok Post on May 24, 2011)

BANGKOK - Fahan (not his real name) smiles as he jokes around with his friends at the Pak Kred Reception Home for Boys, which has served as his temporary home since March 2010. But those smiles due little to hide the deep sadness in the eyes of this nine-year-old Burmese boy, a sadness that perhaps stems from the abuse he suffered before coming to Pak Kred.

06 May 2011

UNICEF Ambassador Anand Panyarachun visits children in conflict with the law



SONGKHLA, Thailand - UNICEF Ambassador Anand Panyarachun visits children in conflict with the law at Songkhla Juvenile Training Centre in southern province of Songkhla during 15-16 February 2011. He met with more than 400 juvenile offenders from the southern provinces, talked with them about their lives and their past mistakes, and listen to their dreams about what they plan on doing when they are released.

04 May 2011

How would you like life to be for children in 2027?


Children participate in the "Vision" exercise which gather options of some 60,000 people across the country on what they want the future to hold for children in Thailand in 2027. © UNICEF Thailand/2011/Napat Phisanbut
 Story by Heamakarn Sricharatchanya

(The story was published in the Bangkok Post on May 15, 2011)

BANGKOK - How would you like life to be for children in 2027? When this question was posed to a group of young people at a forum 6 months ago, some  initially appeared perplexed. Sixteen years is a long time.

19 April 2011

Man U legend Byran Robson helping UNICEF in Bangkok



Story and video by Heamakarn Sricharatchanya

BANGKOK - For many people, football is a sport, a passion and a part of their regional identity. For UNICEF, football is a way of keeping children fit and healthy and of teaching them life skills like discipline and teamwork. UNICEF also teams up with leading football clubs and players to raise awareness and funds for the work on children’s rights.

07 March 2011

School's out



Story by Andy Brown/Video by Heamakarn Sricharatchanya

BANGKOK, Twelve-year-old Nuch (not her real name) lives with her mother Dao, stepfather and five siblings in a single room hut in a small slum settlement near the flower market in Bangkok. She used to go out begging in Bangkok’s commercial district but her mother decided to find another way to earn a living. Now, Dao goes to the market early each morning to buy flowers. She uses these to make garlands, which Nuch and her siblings sell to tourists and worshipers in the temple district of Banglumpu, undercutting the prices in shops.